Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

Titel:
Reports of Visits to Foreign Laboratories, vol. 5 (1926-27) [Illustrated Typoscript in 7 volumes] Reproduced with the kind permission of Dr. Cecil E. Leith
Person:
Benedict, Francis Gano
PURL:
https://digitalesammlungen.uni-weimar.de/viewer/image/lit39748/66/
LUND. SWEDEN 
5 
*> 
*î 
Professor Karl Petren. and discussion on diabetes. 
As Professor Petrin is extremely interested in diabetes, it was only 
natural that on many occasions problems in diabetes should have been discussed. 
Thus, at a dinner at his summer home just before we left, there was considerable 
discussion on this subject, in which Dr. W. M. Boothby (who was there as a 
guest) participated. The discussion centered about Professor Petre'n's low 
figure for nitrogen per day. Dr. Boothby continually referred to a value of 
0.9 gm., but we looked up Professor Petren»s book and could not find such a low 
value. On the other hand, Professor Petren says that he has really secured 
lower values now than was shown in his large book. He objected strongly to 
the use of any individual nitrogen figure for any: day, and said that Friedrich 
Müller told him that when an assistant brought him figures showing a uniform 
nitrogen output per day, he always told him the figures were false. On the 
other hand, Boothby thought that one could get such figures from day to day. 
In discussing the experiences of Newburgh, Petren said that although Newburgh 
undoubtedly worked wholly independent of him, he (Petren) was years ahead of 
Newburgh. At Dr. Joslin’s request I asked him about the incidence of arterio¬ 
sclerosis, but he stated that perhaps, as his patients lived longer on a low 
protein, high-fat diet, he had seen it oftener, but he did not see it in young 
people and there was no hint of an early onset of it. He thought that the 
diabetic would get to a lower nitrogen intake balance than normal, and I sugges¬ 
ted that before they came to this level they were undernourished and this 
means that they had already lost a lot of nitrogen. 
Professor Petren was very enthusiastic about Dr. Joslin. He said that he 
reminded him of his own professor, and he considered that he had the ideal gift 
of a teacher. He also told me that Naunyn died of heart rupture, but on 
autopsy he was found to have cancer of the prostate, although he had had no 
symptoms, and so he had an ideal death.
        

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