Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

Titel:
Psychological and Physiological Apparatus and Supplies: Supplement
Person:
Stoelting, C. H.
PURL:
https://digitalesammlungen.uni-weimar.de/viewer/image/lit13690/57/
54 
C. H. STOULTING CO., CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 
Number 
45431. 
4543 LA, 
45433. 
45435. 
45436. 
45438. 
ages of 10 and 14.5 months as he develops in typical civilized surroundings. The accomplish¬ 
ments of the child are compared step by step with the analogous behavior of his chimpanzee 
companion who is reared with him in the same environment. The age of the animal within 
the time covered by the film ranges between 7.5 and 12 months. Reel No. 2, “Comparative 
Tests on a Human and a Chimpanzee Infant of Approximately the Same Age," demonstrates 
the reactions of a normal infant age 10 to 14.5 months in a series of simple psychological tests. 
The responses of a chimpanzee infant age 7.5 to 12 months in the same tests are compared with 
those of the child. Reel No. 3, “Experiments Upon a Human and a Chimpanzee Infant After 
Six Months in the Same Environment,” demonstrates some of the more complex tests and 
experiments. Reel No. 4, “Some General Reactions of a Human and a Chimpanzee Infant After 
Six Months in the Same Environment,” compares the non-experimental behavior of an infant 
chimpanzee to that of a normal human infant reared with the animal in the same environment. 
The pictures encompass an age range of 13.5 to 16.5 months for the chimpanzee and 16 
to 19 months for the child. 
Reels 1 and 2 give a record of the development of the ape and the child during the first half 
of the nine months’ investigation. 
Reels 2 and 3 demonstrate thirteen of the tests and experiments to w hich the subjects were 
submitted during the entire period of comparison. 
Reels 3 and 4 record the experimental and non-ex périmé niai behavior during the last part of 
the investigation. 
Reels 1 and 4 illustrate the development of incidental behavior traits throughout the whole 
period of the investigation. (107A). 
Prices: Reel No. 1, $36.20; Reel No. 2, $33.60; Reel No. 3, $34.20; Reel No .4, $31.00. Complete 
set of four reels.......................................................................... 
"Experimental Investigation of Babies,” motion picture film, Watson’s. A 34 mm. film from 
Johns Hopkins University. Length, approximately 1200 ft.; time approximately 21 min.; speed, 
standard 16 frames per sec. This is a 2 reel film. After our stock of this film is exhausted, 
it will be carried in the 16 mm. size only.................................................. 
“Experimental Investigation of Babies,” motion picture film, Watson’s. A 16 mm. film from 
Johns Hopkins University. Length, approximately 500 ft.: time, approximately 21 min.: 
speed, standard 16 frames per sec.......................................................... 
“Tile Phi-Plienomenoir,” motion picture film, Ruckmick and Greenwald. A 16 mm. film from 
the State University of Iowa. Length, approximately 230 ft.; time, approximately 8% to 9% 
min.; speed, 16-18 frames per sec. This film shows four different phases of the perception of 
movement. The introductory views show common perceptions of movement in every-day life: 
the movements of lights at the entrances of motion picture theaters, the rotation of automo¬ 
bile wheels, thy passing of scenery as seen from a car. The main portion of the film illustrates 
various phases of alpha, beta, gamma and delta type of movement. The film is fully titled 
and competently timed to be run at the speeds referred to above. Some of the more compli¬ 
cated movements, such as movements in several directions at the same time, are given at 
the end .................................................................................. 
“Motor Conditioning' in Dogs,” motion picture film. Culler’s. A 16 mm. film from the Univer¬ 
sity of Illinois. Length, approximately 189 ft.; time, approximately 7% min.; speed, 16 frames 
per sec. This film shows a carefully standardized method of motor conditioning in dogs. The 
animal responds in the usual way by withdrawing the foot from a metal grid when the sub¬ 
stitute stimulus (tone) is applied. It differs, however, from the usual films on conditioning by 
emphasizing the quantitative aspects of the method. Conditioned behavior sometimes gives 
the impression of a “stunt” which the animal is taught to perform; the result is more interest¬ 
ing than useful. Here, on the contrary, is clearly shown how the sensory acuity of an animal 
may be measured with great precision and how the method may be applied to various scientific 
problems. Particular care was used in securing a good, well-focused negative................ 
“Views of a Decorticate Dog,” motion picture film, Culler’s. A 16 mm. film from the University 
of Illinois. Length, approximately 207 ft.; time, approximately 8 3/5 min.; speed, 16 frames 
lier sec. This film gives direct visual acquaintance with a completely decorticate dog. Abla¬ 
tion of cortex was effected in four stages extending over a period of six months, the film being 
taken about two months after the final entry. Included are scenes showing the animal's 
distinctive postures when standing or recumbent; his mode of locomotion, his behavior under 
difficulties, his ways of eating, his abnormally dilated pupils, his resistance to impressed 
movements, and his rage under slight stimulation. Of special interest for many persons should 
be the clear demonstration of conditioning to a loud tone. To psychologists, physiologists and 
neurologists, in particular to the many who have never had opportunity to see a decorticate 
dog, the film should be of definite value.................................................... 
“Human Vocal Cords in Action,” motion picture film, Tiffin’s. A 16 mm. film from the Iowa 
Laboratories of Experimental Phonetics. Length, approximately 140 ft.; time, approximately 
7 min.; speed, 16 frames per sec. This film gives the student of speech and voice a clear idea 
of the nature and functioning of the vocal cords. It shows the vocal cords from several 
distances, their functioning during breathing and phonation, the adjacent organs including 
the arytenoids and epiglottis, and several remarkable views of the cords in slow motion taken 
with stroboscopic illumination and a magnifying lens. The latter views show each vibration 
slowed down to several seconds duration................................................... 
Price 
$135.00 
83.35 
45.00 
20.70 
17.00 
18.70 
18.40
        

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