Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

Titel:
A history of caricature and grotesque in literature and art
Person:
Wright, Thomas Fairholt, Frederick William
Persistente ID:
urn:nbn:de:gbv:wim2-g-1429385
PURL:
https://digitalesammlungen.uni-weimar.de/viewer/resolver?urn=urn:nbn:de:gbv:wim2-g-1430027
E 
and Gr0te[Que 
cf Caricature 
when we conlider its fingular aptitude to mimic the aitions of man. 
The ancient naturaliils tell us fome curious, though not very credible, 
liories of the manner in which this chara6teriPtic of the monkey tribes was 
taken advantage of to entrap them, and Pliny (Hill. Nat., lib. viii. c. 80) 
quotes an older writer, who alferted that they had even been taught 
to play at draughts. Our third fubje6t from the Egyptian papyrus of the 
Britifh Mufeum (No. 6) reprefents a fcene in which the game of draughts 
-or, more properly fpeaking, the game which the Romans called the 
ludus latrunculorum, and which is believed to have refernbled our draughts 
-is played by two animals well known to modern heraldry, the lion and 
the unicorn. The lion has evidently gained the victory, and is lingering 
the money; and his bold air of fwaggering fuperiority, as well as the look 
of furprife and difappointment of his vanquifhed opponent, are by no 
means ill pictured. This feries of caricatures, though Egyptian, belongs 
to the Roman period- 
The monflrous is clofely allied to the grotefque, and both come within 
the province of caricature, when we take this term in its widelt fenfe. 
The
        

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