Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

Titel:
A history of caricature and grotesque in literature and art
Person:
Wright, Thomas Fairholt, Frederick William
Persistente ID:
urn:nbn:de:gbv:wim2-g-1429385
PURL:
https://digitalesammlungen.uni-weimar.de/viewer/resolver?urn=urn:nbn:de:gbv:wim2-g-1431583
164 
and 
of Caricature 
Grotejgue 
clerk, named Nicholas, of the clafs they call archpoet, was grievoufly ill, 
and when he fuppofed that he was dying, he obtained from our abbot, 
through his own pleading, and the intercellion of the canons of the fame 
church, admifiion into the order. What more? He put on the tunic, 
as it appeared to us, with much contrition, but, when the danger was 
paft, he took it off immediately, and, throwing it down with derilion, took 
to flight." We learn belt the characier of the goliards from their own 
poetry, a contiderable quantity of which is preferved. They wandered 
about from manfion to manfion, probably from monaftery to monailery, 
iutt like the jougleurs, but they feem to have been efpecially welcome at 
the tables of the prelates of the church, and, like the jougleurs, befides 
being well fealted, they received gifts of clothing and other articles. In 
few inftances only were they otherwife than welcome, as defcribed in the 
rhyming epigram printed III my "Latin Poems attributed to Walter 
Mapes." " I come uninvited," fays the goliard to the bifhop, "ready for 
dinner; fuch is my fate, never to dine invited." The bithop replies, " I 
care not for vagabonds, who wander among the fields, and cottages, and 
villages; fuch gueiis are not for my table. I do not invite you, for I 
avoid fuch as you ; yet Without my will you may eat the bread you afk. 
VVafh, wipe, tit, dine, drink, wipe, and depart." 
Golizmlus. 
Non irruiratus wenia prandere paratus; 
Sic fum fatatus, nungzmm prandere -vvmlus. 
Episcopus. 
Non ego euro -uagas, qui rum, mapalia, page: 
Pzrlufirarzt, tale: nan vult men menfajbdnlex. 
Te non imvito, tibi corlfmiles ego vim ; 
Me tamer: in-uiro potizris pane jrerita. 
Ablue, terge, jide, prande, bibs, tzrge, reverie. 
ln another timilar epigram, the goliard complains of the bilhop who 
had given him as his reward nothing but an old Worn-out mantle. Mott 
of the writers of the goliardic poetry complain of their poverty, and 
fome of them admit that this poverty arofe from the tavern and the 
love of gambling. One of them alleges as his claim to the liberality of 
his
        

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